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Image by Pixabay Hello, and welcome back to our asynchronous workshop series, How to Design a Successful Innovation Grant. The series began in September, and it ends this month, when Innovation Grant proposals are due to the Virginia Western Educational Foundation. Let’s review some of our Lab Lessons so far, including: #1: Grant proposals are not time wasted … even if you FAIL #2: Know the rules of the game #3: Focus on NEEDS first, solutions second #4: Begin with the budget #5 Relationships are the secret sauce #6 Baby steps work #7: Assume success So we’re here … March 2022, and applications are typically due the last Friday in March. That brings us to our final Lab Lesson #8 … Respect the details! The fine print is important, especially when it comes to grant applications. You have come so far during this series — you have really thought about the big-picture goals, you understand the needs, created a budget, talked up your idea, and you’re expecting success. Now we have to follow the specific directions in the application. Re-read the first page of the application again, very closely. Hopefully you noticed the signatures required on Page 1. And there...
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Hello, and welcome back to our asynchronous workshop series, How to Design a Successful Innovation Grant. The series began in September, and it will end in March 2022, the same month Innovation Grant proposals are due to the Virginia Western Educational Foundation. If you’re just now joining us, and you intend to submit an application this year, then I would advise you block out some significant time to catch up! It’s still possible! Let’s review some of our Lab Lessons so far, including: #1: Grant proposals are not time wasted … even if you FAIL #2: Know the rules of the game #3: Focus on NEEDS first, solutions second #4: Begin with the budget #5 Relationships are the secret sauce #6 Baby steps work So that brings us to Lab Lesson #7: Assume success. This may seem like a small thing, but one of the tips I learned about writing strong grant proposals was to use confident language. Instead of writing: “For this project, I hope to …” or “If funded, we plan to …” Write as if you WILL be funded. “We will do XYZ, and this how.” If you’ve followed all the steps in this series, really thinking...
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Image by Pixabay Hello, and Happy New Year! If you have followed our asynchronous workshop series, How to Design a Successful Innovation Grant, from the beginning — and have completed most of the “homework” — then this means you have trekked the most difficult part of the journey! It gets easier from here, I promise. The series began in September, and it will end in March 2022, the same month Innovation Grant proposals are due to the Virginia Western Educational Foundation. Hopefully this approach will help you slowly explore your ideas — on your own time, at your convenience — as you continue to juggle your regular to-do list.  If you’re just now joining us, it’s OK! You still have plenty of time to catch up.  Let’s review some of our Lab Lessons so far, including: #1: Grant proposals are not time wasted … even if you FAIL #2: Know the rules of the game #3: Focus on NEEDS first, solutions second #4: Begin with the budget #5 Relationships are the secret sauce Lab Lesson #6 is what inspired this series: Baby steps work. Haven’t they already? If you have been diligently completing each step of the series since last...
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About Stephanie

Stephanie SeagleStephanie Ogilvie Seagle has served as Grant Specialist at Virginia Western since 2016, but she prefers her honorary title: “Chief Joy Officer.” Stephanie spent most of her career at The Roanoke Times, a daily newspaper, where she served in various news and features roles including “Shoptimist” shopping columnist. She earned a bachelor’s degree in integrative studies at George Mason University and a master’s of arts in liberal studies at Hollins University. Stephanie is a mom to one human daughter and multiple chihuahuas … and is obsessed with reading nonfiction, Halloween, and crafting glow necklaces inspired by the Mill Mountain Star. Glow Roanoke!

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