Daily Bulletin title

April 14, 2013

It’s National Library Week!

Library Tip of the Day

We're open 9am-4pm Saturdays in April! Come escape the distractions of home and spend Saturday at Brown.

National Library Week Events:

  • Reading Flash Mob: Bring a book, comics, magazines, graphic novel and READ. Front steps of library, 11:15am on the dot, Friday, April 19th.
  • Word of the Week: Stop by the library to find out our mystery word. Create your own fun definition and enter to win!
  • Library Find-a-Word
  • Snapshot VA
  • Library Survey: Turn in a completed survey and enter for a chance to win $25!

We’ll also have a table at Spring Fling on Friday, April 19th—see you there!

October 4, 2012

What Can You Do About Banned Books?

Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom we have in the U.S. to express our opinions— even if the opinion might be considered unorthodox or unpopular. Unfortunately, not everyone has this right; there are currently many authors around the world who have been imprisoned, or whose lives have been threatened, because of their writings. Check out this slide show, courtesy of the Huffington Post, for more information on how you can help promote freedom of expression and ideas.

Banned Books Week Events

  • Thursday and Friday only, take a break at the library and try your hand at one of our Banned Books Word Searches!
  • Visit Our Displays on the Top Floor. See examples of books that have been banned and find out the reasons behind it.

Interested in finding out more about Banned Books Week? How about a list of Banned Classics or the most frequently Banned Books of the 21st century? Happy reading from the Brown Library staff!

October 3, 2012

Local Real-Life Example of Book Banning (with a Good Ending)

Never heard of banned books before this week? Here’s a great local example of how one person can cause a book to be pulled from the shelves of a school library, therefore letting that one person dictate what they think YOU should read or not read. Thankfully, the book was returned to the shelves and made available to students, although on a more limited basis.

Interested in finding out more about Banned Books Week? How about a list of Banned Classics or the most frequently Banned Books of the 21st century? Happy reading from the Brown Library staff!

 

Thursday and Friday only, take a break at the library and try your hand at one of our Banned Books Word Searches!

Banned Books Week celebrates the freedom we have to express our opinions— even if the opinion might be considered unorthodox or unpopular. Banned Books Week brings attention to the challenges that have been presented to this freedom by celebrating books which have been attempted to be banned in libraries across the country. For a short history of attempts at censoring books, please see The Online Books Page Presents Banned Books Online at the University of Pennsylvania. Included in this page are links to the actual texts of these works, available for free online.

ALL WEEK

  • Visit Our Displays on the Top Floor. See examples of books that have been banned and find out the reasons behind it.

October 2, 2012

Free Movie for Banned Books Week

TODAY ONLY Wednesday at 1pm in Whitman Theater, Student Life and the library will be hosting a free movie showing of Smoke Signals, a film written by Sherman Alexie (author of the banned book, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian).

This award-winning film is “a warm film of friendship and reconciliation, and whenever it refers to historic injustices or contemporary issues in Native American culture, it does so with wry, glancing humor. Smoke Signals is indeed poignant, but above all it’s pretty funny.” Young Indian man Thomas is a nerd in his reservation, wearing oversize glasses and telling everyone stories no-one wants to hear. His parents died in a fire in 1976, and Thomas was saved by Arnold. Arnold soon left his family (and his tough son Victor), and Victor hasn’t seen his father for 10 years. When Victor hears Arnold has died, Thomas offers him funding for the trip to get Arnold’s remains, but only if Thomas will also go with him. Thomas and Victor hit the road. 89 minutes.

THURSDAY and FRIDAY, 10/4-10/5

  • Banned Books Word Searches. All day, Main Floor of the Library.

ALL WEEK

  • Visit Our Displays on the Top Floor. See examples of books that have been banned and find out the reasons behind it.

Want to learn more about Banned Books Week? How about find a list of Banned Classics or the most frequently Banned Books of the 21st century?

Brown Library also has many books which have been challenged and banned, including:

  • Angelou, Maya. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Call number E185.97.A56 A3 1970
  • Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Men. Call number PS3537.T3234 A15 1953 (part of a story collection)
  • Voltaire. Candide, or, Optimism. Call number PQ2082.C3 E5 2005
  • Morrison, Toni. The Bluest Eye. Call number PS3563.O8749 B55 1993
  • Lawrence, D.H. Lady Chatterley’s Lover. eBook. 2007.
  • Walker, Alice. The Color Purple: A Novel. Call number PS3573.A425 C6 1982
  • Salinger, J.D. The Catcher in the Rye. Call number PS3537.A426 C32 1961
  • King, Stephen. Christine. Call number PS3561.I483 C4 1983
  • Eliot, George. Silas Marner. eBook, eAudiobook. 2008.

October 1, 2012

Why Do Books Get Banned?

According to the American Library Assocation,

Books usually are challenged with the best intentions—to protect others, frequently children, from difficult ideas and information. See  Notable First Amendment Cases.

Censorship can be subtle, almost imperceptible, as well as blatant and overt, but, nonetheless, harmful. As John Stuart Mill wrote in On Liberty:

If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind. Were an opinion a personal possession of no value except to the owner; if to be obstructed in the enjoyment of it were simply a private injury, it would make some difference whether the injury was inflicted only on a few persons or on many. But the peculiar evil of silencing the expression of an opinion is, that it is robbing the human race; posterity as well as the existing generation; those who dissent from the opinion, still more than those who hold it. If the opinion is right, they are deprived of the opportunity of exchanging error for truth: if wrong, they lose, what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and livelier impression of truth, produced by its collision with error.

— On Liberty, John Stuart Mill

Often challenges are motivated by a desire to protect children from “inappropriate” sexual content or “offensive” language. The following were the top three reasons cited for challenging materials as reported to the Office of Intellectual Freedom:

  1. the material was considered to be "sexually explicit"
  2. the material contained "offensive language"
  3. the materials was "unsuited to any age group"

Although this is a commendable motivation, Free Access to Libraries for Minors, an interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights (ALA's basic policy concerning access to information) states that, “Librarians and governing bodies should maintain that parents—and only parents—have the right and the responsibility to restrict the access of their children—and only their children—to library resources.” Censorship by librarians of constitutionally protected speech, whether for protection or for any other reason, violates the First Amendment.

Keep checking back throughout the week for more activities and information about banned books!

 

American Library Association. "About Banned & Challenged Books." ala.org. American Library Association, 2012. Web. 1 Oct. 2012.

Do You Read Banned Books?

Celebrate your freedom to read whatever you want by coming to the Banned Books Week Kickoff event at Brown Library!

TODAY ONLY, from 10am-2pm, Student Life and the library will be giving away free copies of the following banned books: The Color Purple (30th anniversary edition), The Hunger Games, or The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. While you’re there, take a break and make your own banned bookmark to go with your book!

And don’t forget to come to the free movie, Smoke Signals, on Wednesday, 1pm!

ALL WEEK

Visit Our Displays on the Top Floor. See examples of books that have been banned and find out the reasons behind it.

The week celebrates the freedom we have to express our opinions— even if the opinion might be considered unorthodox or unpopular. Banned Books Week brings attention to the challenges that have been presented to this freedom by celebrating books which have been attempted to be banned in libraries across the country. For a short history of attempts at censoring books, please see The Online Books Page Presents Banned Books Online at the University of Pennsylvania. Included in this page are links to the actual texts of these works, available for free online.

September 27, 2012

It’s Banned Books Week!

Did you know that September 30th-October 6th, 2012, is the American Library Association’s Banned Books Week? Virginia Western's Student Life Office and Brown Library are partnering on campus yet again to recognize Banned Books Week and the freedom to read!

MONDAY, 10/1   BANNED BOOKS WEEK KICKOFF & Free Book Giveaway!

  • Make Your Own Banned Bookmark. 10am-2pm, Brown Library steps. First 100 participants receive a free banned book. Choice of following titles: The Color Purple (30th anniversary edition), The Hunger Games, or The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.

WEDNESDAY, 10/3

  • Free Film Showing: Smoke Signals. 1pm, Whitman Theatre. Written by Sherman Alexie, author of  The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, this award-winning film is "a warm film of friendship and reconciliation, and whenever it refers to historic injustices or contemporary issues in Native American culture, it does so with wry, glancing humor. Smoke Signals is indeed poignant, but above all it's pretty funny." Young Indian man Thomas is a nerd in his reservation, wearing oversize glasses and telling everyone stories no-one wants to hear. His parents died in a fire in 1976, and Thomas was saved by Arnold. Arnold soon left his family (and his tough son Victor), and Victor hasn't seen his father for 10 years. When Victor hears Arnold has died, Thomas offers him funding for the trip to get Arnold's remains, but only if Thomas will also go with him. Thomas and Victor hit the road. 89 minutes.

THURSDAY and FRIDAY, 10/4-10/5

  • Banned Books Word Searches. All day, Main Floor of the Library.

ALL WEEK

  • Visit Our Displays on the Top Floor. See examples of books that have been banned and find out the reasons behind it.

Brown Library has many books which have been challenged and banned, including:

  • Angelou, Maya. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Call number E185.97.A56 A3 1970
  • Steinbeck, John. Of Mice and Men. Call number PS3537.T3234 A15 1953 (part of a story collection)
  • Voltaire. Candide, or, Optimism. Call number PQ2082.C3 E5 2005
  • Morrison, Toni. The Bluest Eye. Call number PS3563.O8749 B55 1993
  • Lawrence, D.H. Lady Chatterley’s Lover. eBook. 2007.
  • Walker, Alice. The Color Purple: A Novel. Call number PS3573.A425 C6 1982
  • Salinger, J.D. The Catcher in the Rye. Call number PS3537.A426 C32 1961
  • King, Stephen. Christine. Call number PS3561.I483 C4 1983
  • Eliot, George. Silas Marner. eBook, eAudiobook. 2008.

The week celebrates the freedom we have to express our opinions— even if the opinion might be considered unorthodox or unpopular. Banned Books Week brings attention to the challenges that have been presented to this freedom by celebrating books which have been attempted to be banned in libraries across the country. For a short history of attempts at censoring books, please see The Online Books Page Presents Banned Books Online at the University of Pennsylvania. Included in this page are links to the actual texts of these works, available for free online.

September 6, 2012

2012 Virginia Western Summer Games- September 10-17

Monday, Sept 10th: Men's Modified Handball – Gym

3:00 - 5:45 PM

Tuesday, Sept 11th: Coed Table Tennis and Men's and Women's Wii Archery - Thomas Center G205

12:00 - 6:00 PM

Wednesday, Sept 12th: Men's & Women's Shotput and Men's & Women's Cross Country - Back of Anderson and near tennis courts

3:00 - 5:00 PM (Subject to weather)

Thursday, Sept 13th: Coed Wii Boxing and Coed Speed (cards) - Thomas Center G205

12:00 - 6:00 PM

Monday, Sept 17th: Women's Indoor Soccer - 3:00 - 5:45 PM

Signup in the Student Activities Office in Thomas Center G210 or walk-in.  Specific times on Intramurals webpage.  Bring your current student ID the day of competition. Contact Nick Owens with questions at nowens@virginiawestern.edu.

July 11, 2012

Virginia Western Blood Drive

Help fight summer blood shortages for a chance to win a $500 Visa gift card!

  • Monday, July 23
  • 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
  • Natural Science Center
  • Walk-Ins welcome

Please contact Natasha Lee nlee@virginiawestern.edu for more information.

Sign up online at https://vandonor.org/ for Virginia Blood Services' Summer Survival Giveaway

Virginia Western Volunteer Center

 The annual Back 2 School Blast in Roanoke is in need of volunteers for the event on August 12, 2012 who have a heart for helping kids in our community!

Please follow the link for more information: http://back2schoolblast.org/how-to-volunteer/

Contact the Virginia Western volunteer coordinator if you are interested in volunteering at this event.

The volunteer center will also be collecting donations until August 3.  Please drop the items off in the Thomas Center, room 210.  Here is a list of items needed:

Loose leaf paper

Crayons

Spiral Notebooks

Highlighters

Colored pencils

Pocket folders

Erasers

Pencils

Pencil Pouch

Glue

Scissors

1” & 2” 3 ring binders