Daily Bulletin title

October 1, 2012

Diversity Events October 2012

The Cultural Diversity and International Education Committee exists to:

  • promote global education and the acceptance and inclusion of a diverse population,
  • develop and promote initiatives and programs for diversity awareness and understanding, and
  • identify academic issues of international students, such as English as a Second Language, and develop methods to address the issues.

 

As part of our charge to promote inclusion and increase diversity awareness and understanding, we will be sharing Diversity Events with you every month via the Daily Bulletin.  We hope you find this information informative and inspiring.  

Diversity Events 2012

OCTOBER

Information obtained from the National Education Association: http://www.nea.org/grants/42349.htm 

LGBT (was GLBT) History Month

LGBT History Month brings awareness to the problems and the achievements of gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender people. Here are some LGBT resources:

National Bullying Prevention Month

Traditionally held the first week in October, the event has been expanded to include activities, education, and awareness building for the entire month. Check out bullying prevention resources for elementary classrooms to kick off your anti-bullying efforts.

Italian American Heritage Month

Every year the U.S. president signs an executive order designating the month of October as National Italian American Heritage Month in recognition of the achievements and contributions made to American culture by persons of Italian heritage. See Milestones of the Italian American Experience.

October 2
Gandhi's Birthday & International Day of Nonviolence

Mohandas Karamchand “Mahatma” Gandhi is one of the most respected spiritual and political leaders of the twentieth century. Through nonviolent resistance, Gandhi helped free India from British rule. The Indian people called Gandhi “Mahatma,” meaning Great Soul. See Mohandas Gandhi biography.

October 2
Thurgood Marshall Sworn Into Supreme Court

In 1967, Thurgood Marshall became the first African American to sit on the highest court in the land. Opposing discrimination and the death penalty, he championed free speech and civil liberties.

October 3
Frank Robinson Signed as Major League Manager

In 1974, Robinson became the first African American to manage a major league baseball team when he was hired by the Cleveland Indians.

October 6
German American Day

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed this day German American Day, commemorating the 1683 arrival in America of 13 German families on board a sailing vessel. 

October 8
Columbus Day

Celebrated annually on the second Monday in October, this federal holiday honors all explorers and commemorates Columbus’ sighting of the New World in 1492. It is also a time to remember a group of people who discovered America before Columbus: the nomadic ancestors of modern Native Americans

October 16
World Food Day

Since 1979, this worldwide event has sought to increase awareness, understanding, and informed year-round action to alleviate hunger, malnutrition, and poverty.

October 15
Multicultural Diversity Day

Celebrated on the third Monday in October, this day was adopted as a national event by NEA's 1993 Representative Assembly. See Multicultural Diversity Day for more information.

October 20
Birth of the Báb

One of eleven holy days in the Bahá'í calendar, this day honors the Bab, whose mission was to prepare the way for Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the Bahá'í Faith. Learn more about the birth of Bab.

October 24
United Nations Day

In the spring of 1945, representatives of fifty nations gathered in San Francisco to put the final touches to a document of far-reaching consequences - the Charter of the United Nations. The UN Charter went into effect on October 24, 1945. Two years later the UN General Assembly adopted a U.S.-sponsored resolution declaring October 24th United Nations Day. See the United Nations Resources for Educators.

October 25-26
Eid al-Adha

This holiday is the Islamic Feast of Sacrifice, the most important feast of Islam. The three-day festival recalls Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son in obedience to Allah. It concludes the Hajj - the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca. It occurs approximately 70 days after the end of the month of Ramadan.

October 28
Statue of Liberty Dedication

On this day in 1886, President Grover Cleveland dedicated the Statue of Liberty, officially titled "Liberty Enlightening the World." This universal symbol of freedom and democracy was a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of the United States.

October 29
National Organization for Women (NOW) Founded

Since its founding in 1966, NOW has maintained its goal: to take action to bring about equality for all women. Learn more at the NOW site.

October 31
Halloween

Also known as All Hallows’ Eve—the evening before All Saints Day or All Hallows Day—this event has roots in the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (SOW-an). In Gaelic culture, it is a celebration of the end of the harvest season and a time to remember loved ones who have died. Today, in the United States and some Western countries, it is customary to wear costumes and take part in revelry.