Daily Bulletin title

September 4, 2012

Diversity Events September 2012

The Cultural Diversity and International Education Committee exists to:

  • promote global education and the acceptance and inclusion of a diverse population,
  • develop and promote initiatives and programs for diversity awareness and understanding, and
  • identify academic issues of international students, such as English as a Second Language, and develop methods to address the issues.

As part of our charge to promote inclusion and increase diversity awareness and understanding, we will be sharing Diversity Events with you every month via the Daily Bulletin.  We hope you find this information informative and inspiring.    

Diversity Events September 2012

Information obtained from the National Education Association: http://www.nea.org/grants/42349.htm 

September 2
Christa McAuliffe's Birthday

Teacher and NEA member Christa McAuliffe (1948–1986) was America’s first "ordinary citizen" in space. Along with six other crew members, she perished in 1986 on board the Space Shuttle Challenger.

September 3
Labor Day

Labor Day honors the American worker and acknowledges the value and dignity of work and its role in American life. Labor Day was first celebrated on September 5, 1882, in New York, and continued to be celebrated until June 28, 1894, when Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday. Learn more at Labor Day Resources. 

September 8
International Literacy Day

Celebrated since 1965, when it was established by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), this event focuses on reading from a global perspective. Visit UNESCO and International Reading Association for information and activity ideas. 

September 15-October 15
Hispanic Heritage Month

National Hispanic Heritage Month is a national observance authorized by Public Law 100-402. The observation was initiated in 1968 as National Hispanic Heritage Week but was expanded in 1988 to include the entire 31-day period. See Hispanic Education Resources, Issues, & Scholarships

September 16
Mexican Independence Day

September 16 is Independence Day in Mexico and is considered a patriotic holiday. Each year, the president of Mexico rings the bells of the National Palace in Mexico City, celebrating the start in 1810 of Mexico's struggle for independence from Spain. 

September 17
Citizenship Day (or Constitution Day)

On this day in 1787, the 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention met to sign the Constitution of the United States of America. By presidential proclamation, the entire week is given to observing this important anniversary. Visit the National Constitution Center and the Constitution Day web site for more information and teacher resources.

September 21
International Day of Peace

Established by United Nations resolution in 1982, this event is a global holiday when individuals, communities, nations, and governments highlight efforts to end conflict and promote peace. To inaugurate the day, the "Peace Bell" is rung at U.N. headquarters. The bell is cast from coins donated by children from all continents, as a reminder of the human cost of war. For information, visit the International Day of Peace site

September 25
School Desegregation Comes to Little Rock

On this day in 1957, nine teenagers became the first African-Americans to attend all-White Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. The ensuing events riveted the nation and focused a spotlight on racism. President Eisenhower intervened and sent federal troops to protect the students and ensure compliance with the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board of Education decision. For more information, go to Central High School National Historic Site. See PBS Newshour Transcript on 40th anniversary.

September 16-18
Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year)

The Jewish New Year, also known as the Days of Renewed Responsibility, begins at sunset on day one and ends at nightfall the next day. The event is marked by solemn religious observances.

September 25-26
Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement)

The most solemn day of the Jewish year, and one of the most important, the Day of Atonement is typically spent at synagogue in fasting, reflection, and prayer.

September 30 – October 7
Sukkot (Jewish Feast of Tabernacles)

Beginning at sunset on the first day, this seven-day festival celebrates the harvest and commemorates the Jews’ passage through the wilderness.